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Why I Search … Because Not Every Question Has An Answer

When I was a kid I lied to my grandmother every time I saw her. For as long as I can remember my parents, siblings and I would go on a road trip to visit my Grandmother in Wichita, Kansas every summer. Each time we went, when we neared the end of our visit, my […]

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Why a Trip to Turkey could Take your Ministry and Bible Study to the Next Level

​I used to hear the terms “Holy Land” or “Lands of the Bible” and immediately associate them with Israel and Palestine, maybe Egypt for good measure. I’ve come to realize that the biblical text gives primary setting to its stories in an area some four thousand miles across including parts of Iran, Iraq, Syria, Palestine, […]

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Another broken arrow in the quiver of Apologetics: A Review of the film “Patterns of Evidence”

After twelve years of work, filmmaker Tim Mahoney is finally releasing, for one night only (tonight) his documentary, “Patterns of Evidence,” about the archaeological and historical evidence for the biblical exodus. I had the opportunity to view a pre-released version of the film back in November and can attest to the production value that twelve […]

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How Dana DePietro is solving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict with archaeology

In the midst of the rising tensions, conflict and blood-shed in Israel and Palestine, one man, Dr.  Dana DePietro, and a group of supporters, are trying  to use archaeology to de-escalate the conflict one potsherd at a time. I talked to Dana about his unique project, The Society for Humanitarian Archaeological Research and Exploration (SHARE),  in this fourteen […]

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Why context reigns in archaeology and bible study

If you are a writer, pastor or creative you might have heard the adage that “content is king.” It has been the mantra of the blogosphere for years. Even non-creatives have adopted the phrase making it the center of new forms of “content marketing.” But when it comes to archaeology and biblical studies, “context is […]

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Every house in 1st century Israel needed a tekton. Do you?

Most people, who know me personally, know that I come from a family of craftsmen, my grandfathers were machinists and carpenters, my father is a concrete mason, my brother is a stone and brick mason. Since the age of fifteen I have spent nearly every summer working alongside them, augmenting and building homes for our […]

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Judas: Villain or Guest of Honor?

For most of us, Judas Iscariot is the great villain of the passion narrative, but for Jesus, Judas was the guest of honor. We know this because of one seemingly innocuous detail that every gospel writer chose to include when discussing the last days of Jesus.  At the Last supper, Jesus and the twelve disciples […]

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A view from the Chasm: Four changes biblical scholars need to make if they wish to positively engage faith communities.

Dr. Eric M. Meyers in an article published in the March/April issue of Biblical Archaeology Review (published online here) has argued that an “impenetrable divide” exists between academic biblical and archaeological studies and lay/pastoral engagement with the same material. As someone who attempts to stand in the chasm, attempting to find points of application and […]

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Part 2: Do Ancient Near-Eastern Studies cause a crisis for biblical faith?

Elijah’s Crisis As we discussed in Part 1, the biblical text continually interacts with, adopts, rejects, augments, and ignores the cognitive environment of the ancient Near-East in a thousand different ways. In some instances, the interaction of the biblical text with the cultural environment of extra-biblical sources has led to a crisis of faith for […]

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Should we construct biblical narratives from archaeological facts?

Archaeologists tend to be storytellers. While I worked at Ashkelon, one of my most respected supervisors had an uncanny ability to stretch out long, detailed stories about the people who might have inhabited a space using nothing more than a mudbrick hearth and a few associated walls. The stories were captivating. They were more than […]

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